Are you guys a vet?

No.  We are not a vet.

We work with vets around New Zealand to be able to offer you affordable desexing and desexing repayment plans.

Why is there not one price for desexing?

Because we are not a vet and we work with a network of vets all across New Zealand.  We do not set the costs of the desexing procedures and microchip implantation costs.  Every vet clinic is different.

How does your scheme work?

We ask for an upfront non refundable donation deposit of $70 per voucher.

 

We then process your application with a vet in our network that is close to where you live.  This is either a vet you are currently enrolled with or we will find one of our partner vets for you. 

 

If you have a preferred vet not in our system, we will reach out to them and set them up into our network.

 

We do this so that you can create a relationship with your vet for the future health and wellness of your cat.

 

Once your $70 is paid, we will send out your voucher and send a copy to the vet, so they can verify the voucher.

 

It is up you to make an appointment with the vet listed on the voucher.  And our vouchers expire after two months.  It is important you book straight away.

 

Once your cat has had their procedure, they will invoice KittyCat Fixers and we will pay in full.

 

Because we pay full vet prices and struggle with funding, we ask all our clients to repay in donations the remainder of the cost of the desexing procedure.

 

You can repay this from a little as $1 a week.  You set the terms based on what you can afford.

Any donation you make over $5 is eligible for a tax credit of 33.33%. We send out annual donation receipts for you to claim an individual donation tax credit, you can use the IRD's online 'My IR' service to submit a donation receipt. IRD will then check the receipt and refund the tax credit.

 

For instance if your total cats procedure is $300 - and you pay us back in donations - you can claim $99 back from your donations.

 

We now also microchip and register all cats put through our scheme.  And once we get the microchip number from the vet, we will register your cat with NZCAT.

At what age should I desex my cat?

We recommend that all cats are desexed as early as possible in accordance with veterinary advice.

 

Cats can enter puberty as early as three months of age.  It is normal for SPCA, and animal welfare organisations in other countries, to desex healthy kittens as soon as they reach eight weeks old and are at least 1kg in body weight.  It is associated with faster surgical times, fewer complications, and reduced recovery time.

What happens during the desexing prodedure?

While a standard procedure, desexing requires undergoing full anaesthesia.

 

In males, both testicles are removed from beneath the skin. In females, both the uterus and the ovaries are removed through abdominal surgery.

 

Desexing is a common and standard procedure, but as with any surgery involving anesthesia, there are risks involved. However, complications during the desexing procedure are not very common.

Will my cat have stiches?

Depending on the vet, some vets use dissolvable stiches, other vets you will need to return to have the stiches removed.

 

At the incision site(s), stitches will be present, and they can be either internal (not visible externally) or external (visible on the outside). The preference for internal or external stitches will be determined by each veterinarian, and our nurses will inform you, upon discharge, about the type of sutures used and whether they will need removal during the recheck appointment scheduled 10 - 14 days post-surgery.

 

Will my pet feel pain?

Your cat will be given anesthesia and pain medication to reduce pain.  They will feel a slight discomfort just as humans do when we have surgery.

Should I let my cat have a litter first?

No.  Absolutely Not!  Well-meaning people may tell you that your female cat or dog should have a litter or experience a heat cycle/season before she is desexed. However, veterinary science tells us that the opposite is true. Female animals that have not been spayed are at higher risk of developing cancers of the uterus, ovaries and mammary glands, as well as suffering from complications of pregnancy and birthing.

How should I care for my cat following their desexing surgery?

Anticipate that your pet will undergo shaving at the surgical site, including a few additional areas. Typically, a small patch on one or both front legs is shaved for the placement of an intravenous catheter administering fluids during surgery. Additionally, there may be a small shaved area on the neck for blood extraction.

 

 

It is crucial to prevent your pet from licking or chewing at the sutures to avoid further injury or infection. If your pet engages in licking or chewing behavior, the use of an Elizabethan collar, commonly known as "the cone of shame," will be necessary to ensure they cannot reach the surgery site.

 

Expect your pet to be sedated for the first 12 - 24 hours postoperatively, and it's essential to maintain a quiet environment for them until the recheck appointment. This can be challenging, especially considering that pets are generally desexed at a young age. However, keeping them calm and quiet during this healing period is vital to prevent any disruption or harm to the stitches.

Reduce unwanted. pregnancies.

Reduce stray cat populations.

Reduce aggressive behaviour.

Reduce spraying.

Reduce wandering.

Prevent reproductive behaviours - in heat, yowling and crying.

Prevent mammary cancer in females.

Prevent FIV.

Prevent testicular cancer and prostate cancer.

Prevent injury.

Desex your cat
Desex your cat

Are you guys a vet?

No.  We are not a vet.

We work with vets around New Zealand to be able to offer you affordable desexing and desexing repayment plans.

At what age should I desex my cat?

We recommend that all cats are desexed as early as possible in accordance with veterinary advice.

 

Cats can enter puberty as early as three months of age.  It is normal for SPCA, and animal welfare organisations in other countries, to desex healthy kittens as soon as they reach eight weeks old and are at least 1kg in body weight.  It is associated with faster surgical times, fewer complications, and reduced recovery time.

What happens during the desexing prodedure?

While a standard procedure, desexing requires undergoing full anaesthesia.

 

In males, both testicles are removed from beneath the skin. In females, both the uterus and the ovaries are removed through abdominal surgery.

 

Desexing is a common and standard procedure, but as with any surgery involving anesthesia, there are risks involved. However, complications during the desexing procedure are not very common.

Will my cat have stiches?

Depending on the vet, some vets use dissolvable stiches, other vets you will need to return to have the stiches removed.

 

At the incision site(s), stitches will be present, and they can be either internal (not visible externally) or external (visible on the outside). The preference for internal or external stitches will be determined by each veterinarian, and our nurses will inform you, upon discharge, about the type of sutures used and whether they will need removal during the recheck appointment scheduled 10 - 14 days post-surgery.

 

Will my pet feel pain?

Your cat will be given anesthesia and pain medication to reduce pain.  They will feel a slight discomfort just as humans do when we have surgery.

Should I let my cat have a litter first?

No.  Absolutely Not!  Well-meaning people may tell you that your female cat or dog should have a litter or experience a heat cycle/season before she is desexed. However, veterinary science tells us that the opposite is true. Female animals that have not been spayed are at higher risk of developing cancers of the uterus, ovaries and mammary glands, as well as suffering from complications of pregnancy and birthing.

How should I care for my cat following their desexing surgery?

Anticipate that your pet will undergo shaving at the surgical site, including a few additional areas. Typically, a small patch on one or both front legs is shaved for the placement of an intravenous catheter administering fluids during surgery. Additionally, there may be a small shaved area on the neck for blood extraction.

 

 

It is crucial to prevent your pet from licking or chewing at the sutures to avoid further injury or infection. If your pet engages in licking or chewing behavior, the use of an Elizabethan collar, commonly known as "the cone of shame," will be necessary to ensure they cannot reach the surgery site.

 

Expect your pet to be sedated for the first 12 - 24 hours postoperatively, and it's essential to maintain a quiet environment for them until the recheck appointment. This can be challenging, especially considering that pets are generally desexed at a young age. However, keeping them calm and quiet during this healing period is vital to prevent any disruption or harm to the stitches.

Reduce unwanted pregnancies
Reduce stray cat populatons
Reduce agressive behaviour
Reduce Spraying
Reduce Wandering
Prevent reproductive behaviours - in heat, yowling and crying.
Prevent mammary cancer in females
Prevent FIV
Prevent testicular cancer and prostate cancer
Prevent Injury
Desex your cat
We need your help!
Donate today, so that we can continue to desex as many cats as possible around the country
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